New Year, new album: ‘Invisible Music’

Happy New Year… the world may be going to shit, but I’m finding joy in little things. Allow me to share some.

New album: ‘Invisible Music: folk songs that influenced Angela Carter’

In April, I am releasing my eighth album, ‘Invisible Music: folk songs that influenced Angela Carter’, which is a mixture of traditional folk songs and spoken word, and which explores via proximity ways in which the novelist Angela Carter was influenced by singing traditional folk songs in the 1960s.

These songs are bizarre, grotesque, bloody, and beautiful, sometimes conventionally, and sometimes in the way a gnarled bit of wood can be.

I intersperse songs with readings (by myself, Kathryn Williams and Kirsty Logan) to show the relationship.

This album is the sonic accompaniment to my recently-completed PhD thesis of the same title, a deep-dive research project into the many ways I believe being a singer, and having the muscle memory of singing, influenced Carter’s imagination and language style.

Mailing list

Sign up to my mailing list to receive a free song ‘Jack Munro’ from the album  — and to keep up to date with all my news as the release happens.

Live shows

To mark the album’s release on Friday 23 April, I’m doing some shows, mostly online for now – but with one significant live exception at Cecil Sharp House on Thur 22 April. Here’s a list of all my forthcoming shows.

More for patrons

I’ll be doing lots more for my Patreon patrons — weekly vlogs, music premieres, early bird ticket chances and behind the scenes snippets… .

Patreon involvement starts from a very modest £4/month; on higher tiers I offer house concerts and songwriting tuition as part of membership.

Explore it if you haven’t already at patreon.com/pollypaulusma

Stay well, keep safe.

London Library gig

I have another date for your virtual diaries: Thur 7 May, 7pm. Please do join me online for a live streamed gig, hosted by The London Library.

If she were still with us, Angela Carter would have turned 80 this May and 7 May would have been her birthday. I was scheduled to celebrate by performing at The British Library alongside the singer-songwriter Kathryn Williams and the novelist Kirsty Logan, showcasing a collaborative musico-literary project we’ve been hatching (pardon the pun) inspired by Carter’s ‘Nights at the Circus’. God willing, we will bring it to you in good time.

In the meantime, I have been working on my own separate project, ‘Invisible Music’ – my PhD – exploring how being a folk singer affected the way Carter wrote her prose. I discovered that she was a folk singer in the 1960s and embarked on a big research project thanks to an incredibly generous research grant from CHASE, the Consortium for Humanities and the Arts South East. Along the way, I couldn’t help but sing the songs I was writing about, to better understand their impact. I have made an album of these songs alongside pertinent readings from Carter’s fiction, to bolster my research.

I was always planning to play at the London Library around this time, one show designed to complement the other. But now, because of current events, it stands alone, and has moved online, and to the day that matters most, Carter’s birthday.

I feel very honoured to be able to make this tribute to her, which also marks the beginning of my small contribution to the rich critical conversation which her works continue to inspire and provoke.

And to make this even better, Kathryn Williams and Kirsty Logan are contributing their beautiful reading voices to the gig, reading extracts from Carter’s work.